Category Archives: Philosophy

A Memorial Post For Those We Miss The Most

We’ve all lost someone we loved.  It’s devastating.

Cruising and perusing through Facebook, it seems like a lot of us have lost someone recently.  My heart goes out to you man.  I hope you’re hanging in there.  Having lost a few peeps myself, I know words can only do so much to comfort.  But what the hell, it’s worth a shot.  And it’s also worth trying something a little different.

So Kalai and I wanted to share something with you.  Over Memorial Day, we got to experience one of the coolest things we’ve ever been a part of – Lantern Floating Hawaii 2014, a ceremony to honor and remember the ones we’ve lost, and perhaps find some closure. Read the rest of this entry

10 Tips For Tough Times

I sat down to write a completely different blog post today.  My plan was to catch you up on all of the stuff I’ve been doing to fulfill my duty as your “People’s Nutrition Educator” – researching for and speaking at nutrition conferences, doing interviews and podcasts, etc.

I promise to do that soon, because I have a ton of outlines, notes, and research quotes that I think you’ll find interesting and informative.

But alas, that must wait.  There are more important issues we must talk about today.  Not often, but every once in a while, I like to talk about things that are more thought provoking (and probably more helpful to you) than protein grams and 6-packs. Read the rest of this entry

The Irish Farmer’s Diet

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!  May you have a little luck of the Irish, and get lucky, tonight.

In year’s past, right about this time of day, I’d be getting a call from Ol’ Patty — my full-blooded, Irish mama.   She would undoubtedly go on a profanity-laced tirade, yell at me about something, and then proceed to tell me how St Patrick’s Day is, and always will be, the greatest day of the year.  She’d also tell me what restaurant I was to take her to that upcoming weekend for steak and booze to celebrate.

But unfortunately, she ain’t around no more.  So I decided to do a post in honor of one of her wishes instead. She used to ask, “when are you going to talk about your better side’s diet — your Irish side’s diet.  You always just talk about that dumb Japanese diet”  Yes, she was slightly racist, even against her own children.  What can you say? She was one of a kind, and I loved her.

Here’s a video that talks about the benefits of my mama’s “Irish Farmer’s” diet, and how you can use that and other healthy cultural diet templates, to simplify the food choice process. I lean more towards carb-based diets for anaerobic athletes and those who strength train on a regular basis, so the ol’ meat and potatoes fits in perfect.  Thank my mama for being in my ear all the time about this one: Read the rest of this entry

Men’s Fitness Article: 5 Keys to Conquering Any Fitness Challenge

When you understand yourself and you understand the enemy you cannot be defeated. ~ Miyamoto Musashi

What is the biggest cause of failure in fitness, besides my buddies Ben & Jerry, and Mrs. Butterworth? Honestly, it has nothing to do with the details of a diet or training program.  Most people know what to do.  Since I’ve dedicated my life and career to this game, I’d love to make it seem more complicated in order to validate my credentials, schooling, and personal obsession.  But it just isn’t so.

The “what to do” is straightforward and simple.

So why do some breeze through with ease, while others constantly get stuck in a rut?

Well, nothing can cure outright laziness and entitlement to be honest.  But beyond that, if you have sincere goals and are willing to put forth an honest effort, I think it all comes down to having the right mindset and the right strategies.  Some may write this off as self-help nonsense, but if you haven’t gotten to where you want to go, you have no right to criticize.  In fact, you might want to throw an ear in and listen.

Read the rest of this entry

10 Reasons Books Are the Best Teachers

I can’t coach you man.  You’re un-coachable.  I’m un-coachable.  It’s Y2K plus change baby.  We’re all fucking un-coachable.

We have too many preconceived notions.  We fight back with what we think we know instead of putting plans into action and seeing if they actually work.

We cling to dogma and tradition instead of having the courage to try other methods.  We favor fitting in with our social circles instead of finding truth or efficiency.

We have massive egos. We are offended when someone disagrees or suggests an alternative strategy. So we tune them out.  Or worse, we ask them to coach us on our own methods.  I never understood that one?

We’d rather project an aura of intelligence or superiority, even in areas outside of our expertise, than be humble enough to learn and improve.

We ask too many questions – often times a disguise for fear or procrastination – instead of having faith in a plan, and embracing the process of struggle, growth, and evolution along the way.

We are good at acquiring information overload, but terrible at applying anything.  We are good talkers and pontificators, but terrible doers.

It’s like this Zen story:

Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen.
Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring.
The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. “It is overfull. No more will go in!”
“Like this cup,” Nan-in said, “you are full of your own opinions and speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?” – 101 Zen Stories

It is 2014. We don’t have cups of tea anymore. We have 84-ounce jugs.  Yet our jugs of tea are still full.  And although some of our teas taste like shit, we’re too proud or scared to empty that trash out and try a new one.

How do you break through that force field? You blast through it with great books.

Maybe I’m just a shitty coach?  I’m fully prepared to admit that. I’ve always looked at myself as an athlete and student who enjoys sharing what has helped me, rather than a coach.

But maybe after 15 years of watching how people learn best, I’m on to something.

Regardless, here are 10 reasons why I believe books make the best teachers.

Read the rest of this entry